Conclusion

At this point, you should have a deep and nuanced understanding of not just how Javascript works but how you can use it with all the other knowledge you’ve gained so far to build exceptional web applications.

If you find something you don’t know or aren’t quite sure about, you should be a pro by now at Googling your way to an answer, looking at docs, and cruising through Stack Overflow posts. You’ve got all the tools you need to be a developer. And, really, the big secret is that you’ve been a web developer for a long time already.

So where do you go from here? BUILD! Build and build and build and build (see a theme in this curriculum yet?). Use what you’ve learned to create great projects. Get a job so someone else pays you to build. But focus on creating interesting software and using that to drive your education.

There’s a whole world of additional things you can learn — D3 for data visualization, other full-stack frameworks or single-page MVC front-end frameworks… all that stuff is best learned when you’ve got something you want to build that requires "the perfect tool for the job."

And speaking of jobs, if you’ve made it this far then you’ve displayed the kind of capability and drive that employers are looking for. The final step is to show that to the world and get them to pay you to keep learning.

Additional Resources


Material based on Erik Trautman | The Odin Project

Feedback

  • Is there anything we can help with up to this point? Do you have something to suggest about this chapter? Let us know in the comments below.

UPDATED: 01.02.2021

Project: Final Project

Instructions

Copy your favorite website as well as you can. Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter… Just make sure it’s got lots of interesting functionality. You’ll be integrating your full array of skills into this one….

Of course, you can’t copy every single feature and a lot of the user interface will be a bit clunkier, but you can get yourself 80% of the way there. And that’s darn impressive.

  1. Think about what you’ll need to do to get this all working together. This is where it’s really helpful to think it completely through on paper or whiteboard ahead of time! A few hours of thought here will save you from wasting days of coding. Try to lay it ALL out. An important part of this is scope — you obviously can’t build the entire website (which presumably took a full team of engineers years to produce), so you’ll need to identify the core functionality of the site and then the "nice-to-have" stuff. Make sure you will finish building the core functionality BEFORE starting to add on the rest. If you try to do it all at once, you’ll get lost and frustrated. Trust me. Everything takes longer than you expect.

  2. Build it!

  3. Try testing the very high level Javascript functionality with Jest. Don’t get too bogged down in testing, but try and save yourself time by adding high level tests so you don’t need to click around 100 times every time you make a change to something that seems important.

  4. Once you’ve finished, push to Github’s specified folder and definitely submit your project below!

Good luck!


Material based on Erik Trautman | The Odin Project

Feedback

  • Is there anything we can help with up to this point? Do you have something to suggest about this chapter? Let us know in the comments below.

UPDATED: 01.02.2021